A short guide to expense policies for growing businesses

by Patrick Whatman | November 29, 2018

Ready to create an expense management policy for your business? Not sure? Good. Either way, you've come to the right place.

We're certain that having a formalised, written down expense policy is vital for any business. So in this post, we're going to explain why, and show you what need to be included in a great expense policy.

The goal is to help you write a policy that works for everyone in the business, and doesn't take weeks of work. Should be easy.

We're going to do this in a hurry. So if you want more detail, we've put together a charming little guide to help. You can download the full guide right here, for free:

New Call-to-action

It looks at the many of the same concepts as we're about to, but with deeper explanation. Basically, it's an upgrade on this here post.

Now, let's look at a few of the big ideas covered in the guide.

What is a company expense policy?

It's often overlooked, but having a formal expense policy for your business is essential. For starters, it helps the senior leadership team figure out how team members should be encouraged to spend company money.

Rather than coming up with guidelines on an ad hoc basis - "I don't know, let's ask the boss" - you set out the rules before anyone has even thought about spending.

It'll also give clear guidance to staff whenever they need it. And they won't have to both the CEO or finance team every time they need to make a payment.

As with most office processes, it's always best to have this written down. But what makes a good policy?

Keys to a successful policy

Your expense policy will be yours, and naturally it'll custom-fit to your business. Even so, there are certain things you'll always need to include:

  1. Create clear categories and budgets. Employees need to know how much is allowed, and how they should categorise their purchases.
  2. Be fair. Consistency is key. You shouldn't plan to treat different employees differently, and your policy needs to be applied company-wide.
  3. Keep it simple. Almost nobody is passionate about expenses (except Spendesk!), and your team isn't going to read a novel. You want them to be able to answer their own questions, so keep it short and sweet.
  4. Update often. This should be the same for most company processes. Make sure it's somebody's responsibility to see whether team members are using it, and how it can be improved.
  5. Check the regulations! Obviously, the most important thing is to keep compliant with the local laws. You probably thought of this first, but here's your friendly reminder.

Those are just a few helpful guidelines. But what should your expense management policy actually contain?

What to include in a company expense policy

Let's get into the nitty gritty. What does an expense policy need to have in it?

Budgets for each expense category

To begin with, you need to explain who sets the budgets for each team or type of expense, and who manages them. Employees need to know who to turn to when they're unsure.

budget-expense-policy-guide

Even better, your policy should aim to include the specific budgets for each type of spending - travel, office supplies, marketing and advertising, and so on.

Because budgets fluctuate with the seasons and as needs arise, this may not be possible. Instead, try to include general rules and guidelines for budgets.

But your policy should be a living document, and keeping it up to date should be a matter of course. So including actual, exact budgets isn't impossible by any means.

A plan for reimbursements

Two things to remember when thinking about reimbursements:

  1. Employees need to be reimbursed. This is both a legal requirement and the right thing to do.
  2. Employees have better things to do than file expense reports. Most will put it off or completely forget to do it. Even though it's their money!

You need to be explicit about what they need to do to claim expenses. What's the process, who is responsible, and is there a time limit?

These factors should all be clearly laid out in the policy, and employees need to know to take them seriously.

Suitable payment methods

How team members pay for things is also important. Within your business, there are usually a variety of ways that expenses can be paid.

Your expense policy needs to give clear procedures for:

  • Payments with the company card(s): Who's in control of the company card? And how do employees record a new payment? Shared cards can get unwieldy, with users from all over the organization making payments both in-store and online. It's vital that the process is clearly defined.
  • Online payments: Consider the number of running subscription payments your business has. Every new marketing, sales, and administrative tool has its own lifecycle and payment due date. Again, team members need to know what's required as they make these payments.
  • Employee expense advances. Occasionally businesses will give employees an advance to cover upcoming costs. This can be necessary where the amount is too high to expect an employee to cover it on their own. Because this is more rare, your policy should explain exactly how it works.
  • Payments from an employee's own pocket. We've already talked about reimbursements. Your policy should also explain when and why employees might need to use their own money for work expenses.

Remember, every workplace has its own way of handling spending. So even experienced staff may not have done things your way before.

Make sure your policy helps them spend easily while staying compliant with your way of operating.

Headaches: classic spending policy problems to avoid

Hopefully your spending policy is already pretty well defined - it's just a matter of writing it down.

Even so, there are a red flags typical to most businesses. Since you're taking the time to formalise your policy, it's the perfect chance to make sure you're not making one of these classic errors.

problems-expense-policy-guide

The petty cash box

If you've been using petty cash for some time (like most offices), you probably figure what's the harm? Jordan guards the key, and it's only small amounts at a time anyway. Even if we don't know exactly where that money goes, that's why it's petty cash.

This is just not how company money should be spent. Every penny needs to be accounted for. And taking a few notes out from time to time is just asking for abuse.

Plus, it's not actually efficient. Cards are accepted all over these days, and are more trackable and harder to abuse. Plus, an expense card lets you pay for things online, which is still beyond the powers of petty cash.

Paper expense claims

Offices are going paperless, even when they still use old-fashioned processes like expense reports. If you're going to ask employees to pay upfront and then request reimbursement, the least you can do is automate this.

What's more, paper expense reports are just easier to get wrong. First, they can become lost - just like paper receipts. It's also harder to set parameters like you would with a digital form. So you'll have to manually check every calculation.

Plus, too many businesses take these paper forms and then manually enter the data into spreadsheets or accounting tools. Why not skip this and have employees enter that data from the start?

If you're looking for good tools to help you automate this process, here are our favourites.

Expense fraud

Fraud is a scary word. But not every case involves the Wolf of Wall Street or Bernie Madoff.

A lax or loose expense policy leaves the door open for employees to take advantage. And while you probably trust everyone in your organization, it's always possible for people to claim slightly more than they spent, or to seek reimbursement for non-work-related costs.

Reports have found that expense fraud impacts up to 15% of companies. And since you don't want yours to be one of them, there are some simple steps you can take to problems.

Employee unhappiness

This is a problem that most businesses simply overlook. Filing expense reports and tracking spending just aren't fun for anyone.

The employee has to keep receipts and painstakingly record every transaction, often weeks or months after making them.

And the finance team spends days every month just reconciling these reports and making sure that everyone gets reimbursed.

These are issues that executives don't often think about (or choose to ignore). But if you have everyday processes in the business that everyone hates, this can cause major problems for productivity.

Time to get to work

Creating an expense policy isn't the most exciting task in the world. But it's necessary, and will certainly help you avoid major issues in the future.

Plus, it's not actually too tricky. You just need to know what to include, and think a little about the specific challenges facing your business.

The good news is that we can help. Download this free guide to make sure that your expense management policy is everything it should be:

New Call-to-action

We hope it helps!

 

TOPICS : Expense management

Add a comment

0 Comment